How much photoshopping is too much? Authenticity is the new photo editing trend

LRP Photo editingIf you’re on Facebook, you’ve probably seen something about Cindy Crawford in the last week or so. Unretouched photos of the former super model were released (or leaked, depending on the version of the story you read). I agree with much of the Internet, that she looks fabulous.

This is not the first time that celebrities have posed for or fought to have their pictures unretouched before publication. In this article from Marie Claire, several photo editing controversies are discussed. It covers everything from a journalist who had her picture photoshopped to match beauty standards in different countries, to stars who were upset over changes made to their image before publication.

Does this mean we don’t retouch photos?

Sure, photos are still touched up but instead of making a model appear 15 pounds lighter or have smoother looking skin than she already has, the touch ups are a bit more natural.

Authenticity in photography editing is a growing trend and I think it’s a positive move. The idea is to be more real in how we portray everything in photography. For people, they look more real instead of sculpted or “plastic.” Food photography shows crumbs and other messes instead of a pristine plate. We use even more natural light. Colors retouched in processing are allowed to remain more true than being brightened for emphasis.

Sometimes pictures capture hair flyaways or minor skin blemishes that wouldn't be noticed in person.
Sometimes pictures capture hair flyaways or minor skin blemishes that wouldn’t be noticed in person.
I make minor touch ups in the editing process to help clients look like themselves, only better.
I make minor touch ups in the editing process to help clients look like themselves, only better.

 

Something I tell clients all the time is that I make them look like themselves, only better. That’s my way of saying that when I take their photograph, the end result will look like them and be an accurate representation of who they are. I do, however, fix minor flaws in the photography that would likely not be noticed when speaking to the person. For example, I fix flyaway hairs that might happen in a breeze or smooth skin tones or wrinkles to bring out the person’s best features. You wouldn’t notice these perceived blemishes in person, but in a still photograph it’s captured in time.

What do you think of this trend? Do you want to see a celebrity’s so-called faults? How much do you want your own photos retouched?