Great summer photos Part 1: Solutions to common problems

So you have the perfect family vacation planned and you know you want to capture it all on camera for your scrapbook, social media and framed pictures.

In this two-part series, we’ll talk about how to get the best summer photos on your vacation. Today, we’ll talk discuss the solutions to the top three problems people seem to have with their picture taking while on vacation. I know I love to look at my family vacation photos and remember the stories those pictures tell!

Bulky camera? No problem!

I found these examples on Amazon of small, quality digital cameras that fit in your pocket. These are less than $500, making them a reasonable solution for family vacation pictures.
I found these examples on Amazon of small, quality digital cameras that fit in your pocket. These are less than $500, making them a reasonable solution for family vacation pictures.

I’m the first to admit that carrying around a professional quality DSLR can be cumbersome while at a local vacation attraction. Camera phones aren’t always the greatest quality and they can fill up the storage pretty quickly.

So what’s a family to do? I suggest getting a small pocket camera that is easy to carry around and even easier to slip into a sealable plastic bag for when you go on the wet rides (Roaring Rapids, anyone?).

There are many small digital cameras on the market that are reasonably priced and take quality photos.  I personally use a Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX5 when my larger, more professional-use Canon 5D Mark II is too cumbersome to bring along. The Lumix is convenient and has a fast shutter response. I love not having a delay when snapping a photo. How many times have you clicked the shutter and it took so long for the picture to take that the baby smiling or the big splash moment was over?

 

Squinty eyes no more

Do you ever stop to take photos of your kids and they squint or cover their eyes? Putting your kids in the shade will not only prevent the squinting but will also make for the best looking photo since you won’t have harsh highlights from the sun. If you can plan around it, take your photos late in the day when the sun is close to setting.

 

Out-of-balance light exposure

These pictures were taken straight from the camera with no editing to demonstrate how big of a difference using the manual flash can make when your photo subject is heavily back-lit.
These pictures were taken straight from the camera with no editing to demonstrate how big of a difference using the manual flash can make when your photo subject is heavily back-lit.

Have you ever taken photos and the background was bright but the people were dark? This is because your camera sensor is exposing for the bright background which underexposes the darker object in the picture such as the person you are taking a photo of.

You can fix this by using your manual flash on your camera (yes, even in daylight). Most cameras have an automatic flash and won’t go off if the scene is brightly lit so you have to be smarter than the camera. A flash will brighten the subject just enough to make a better exposed image.

What other common summer-time photo problems do you experience? Leave a comment and I might be able to help! Also, come back Thursday for the second part of this series. I’ll be sharing basic tips for making sure you have a photogenic summer. 

One thought on “Great summer photos Part 1: Solutions to common problems

  1. Marsha Holloway says:

    Thanks so much for the camera tips, I bought myself a EOS Cannon Rebel T3i, have been thinking about taking a class at Bedford. Any suggestions?

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